SUMMARY

The pilot project demonstrated the system's capability to capture approximately 1 tonne/day of CO₂.

By Shardul Sharma

UK's Lomar Labs, a division of Lomar Shipping, on February 10 announced the successful completion of sea trials for a carbon capture system on board a Lomar vessel. Developed in collaboration with climate tech start-up Seabound, the pilot project demonstrated the system's capability to capture approximately 1 tonne/day of CO₂.

The Seabound technology, integrated into the engine exhaust funnel of the Lomar container ship Sounion Trader, utilised a prototype system during the trials. The carbon capture system not only showcases the feasibility of reducing CO₂ emissions but also doubles as a SOx scrubber, achieving two objectives with a single, recyclable and safe device.

The pilot project's success highlights the effectiveness of Seabound's second-generation carbon capture technology, known as calcium looping. This innovative approach transforms CO₂ emissions into solid calcium carbonate pebbles. The limestone pebbles are inert, non-toxic, and entirely recyclable. They can be stored on board and offloaded in port for sale in pure form. Alternatively, they can be converted back into quicklime and CO₂, allowing for reuse onboard another vessel and the sale of captured CO₂ for utilisation or sequestration.

"This successful sea trial represents a pivotal moment for Seabound, Lomar, and Lomar Labs, together with the broader maritime industry. We are proud to have collaborated with Seabound to pioneer this sustainable solution in our efforts to support maritime innovation and cleaner, safer oceans," Nicholas Georgiou, CEO of Lomar, said.